2012 Carnival Parades in Rio de Janeiro – 02

Ângela Bismarchi pictured a medieval warrior in the parade of Mocidade Independente - photo: Alexandre Durão/ G1

The last four samba schools of the first day in Rio were, in order, Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel, Porto da Pedra, Beija-Flor de Nilópolis and Unidos de Vila Isabel.

Decorated float 'Ainda vivemos em guerra, porém sonhamos com paz' (We are still at war, but we dream of peace). The last great work of Portinari were the paintings 'War and Peace' - photo: Christophe Simon / AFP

There were two very specials in this group of four. Beija-Flor, the 2011 champion, attempted to win its 13th title, as the school invested in the theme “São Luís, o poema encantado do Maranhão” (São Luis, the enchanted poem of Maranhão), about the capital of the federal state of Maranhão.

Member of Mocidade showed much sympathy in the parade - photo: Christophe Simon / AFP

And with the responsibility to close the first night of the parades, Vila Isabel put the entire audience to dance to the sound of drums with the theme “Você semba lá… que eu sambo cá – o canto livre de Angola” (You semba there … I sambo here – the free song of Angola), written by carnival enthusiast Rosa Magalhães. The blue and white showed in the Sambódromo the cultural ties between Brazil and the African country.
Here we go.

Mulatas of Mocidade danced the samba in Sapucaí - photo: Carolina Lauriano/G1

4th – Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel
Instead of silk and sprays, brushes and crayons. In this year’s carnival samba school Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel created colourful costumes and allegories painted by hand to tell the story ‘Por Ti, Portinari. Rompendo a tela, a realidade’ (For You, Portinari. Breaking the screen, the reality), of carnivalesque Alexandre Louzada. The inspiration came from the artist’s works.

Members of Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel danced the samba on top of a allegoric float - photo: Sergio Moraes/Reuters

The paintings in crayons were mixed with crystals, feathers and sequins, giving effect to the craftsmanship and detail of Mocidade’s carnival. Alexandre Louzada said that many panels of the painter Cândido Portinari were made with crayons, less toxic than paint, so he wanted to make this reference in the clothes of the 3,500 dancers and the drums group of the masters Bereco and Dudu.

Antônia Fontenelle, Queen of the drums of Mocidade, before the parade started. She said she wants to leave the Avenue with a sense of accomplishment - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

The “grand finale” is the panel on “Guerra e Paz” (War and Peace), considered the masterpiece of the artist, who was present in the last float. The fourth school which paraded on Sunday (19 Febr.), samba school Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel took eight floats, three tripods and 30 dancing groups to the avenue.

Mocidade Independente de Padre brought colourful costumes to tell the story of Portinari - photo: Serio Moraes / Reuters

Float of Mocidade recalled the coffee pickers, emblematic characters in the paintings of Portinari - photo: Serio Moraes / Reuters

Member of Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel samba in the Sapucaí- photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Outstanding allegoric float of Mocidade - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Member of Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel samba in the Sapucaí- photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Members of Mocidade danced the samba on top of a float during the parade in Sapucaí - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

One of the highlights of Mocidade Independente de Padre Miguel - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

The fifth float of Mocidadepictured the exodus from the sertanejo (backlands) - photo: Alexandre Durão/ G1

Mocidade brought handpainted colorful costumes to tell the story 'Por Ti, Portinari. Rompendo a tela, a realidade' (For You, Portinari. Breaking the screen, the reality) - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito / G1

Antônia Fontenelle, Queen of the drums, in front of the instrumentalists - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

5th – Porto da Pedra
In 2011 Porto da Pedra dared to take one of its members trapped in a gas balloon to Sapucaí, in the carnival this year, the samba school exuded the sweet smell of yoghurt in the Avenue. The school from São Gonçalo made sure that an exhilarating and delightful parade showed the benefits of yogurt to mankind. In its attempt to achieve the (still a dream) title, Porto da Pedra bet on the theme “Da seiva materna ao equilíbrio da vida” (From maternal sap to the balance in life), developed by carnivalesque James Cesario.

Decorated float 'Iguarias do Imperador Chinês' (Delicacies of the Chinese Emperor) - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

The school travelled along derivatives such as cheese until reaching yogurt to show how the product won the civilization of China to Europe: “Yogurt is the greatest symbol of health, joy and vitality, synonymous with our carnival. The samba schools main intention of this parade is: seducing Sapucaí with a plot about yogurt and leave everyone with a watering mouth”.

Muses of samba school Porto da Pedra - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

For the second year ahead of the drummers of Master Thiago Diogo, the queen of drums, the actress Ellen Roche, visualised the “richness of milk”. After winning the eighth place in the carnival session of 2011, Porto da Pedra was the fifth school to parade on Sunday (19 Febr.), and took seven floats, 3,800 dancers divided in 33 groups to the avenue. The couple of master of ceremonies and standard-bearer Fabricio Pirez and Cristiane Caldas completed the parade.

Fabiane Rodrigues, was oneof the highlights of a float of Porto da Pedra - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Dancing with Porto da Pedra - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Ellen Roche, queen of the drums of Porto da Pedra during the parade in Sapucaí - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

One of the highlights of samba school Porto da Pedra - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Dancer of samba school Porto da Pedra during the parade- photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

Members of the dancing group 'Ritos Tribais' (Tribal Rites), of samba school Porto da Pedra - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Dancers baianas of Porto da Pedra - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Fabiane Rodrigues, was the attraction of an allegoric float of Porto da Pedra - photo: Felipe Dana / AP

Solange Gomes, queen of the samba school Porto da Pedra - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Solange Gomes, queen of samba school Porto da Pedra - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Ellen Roche, queen of the drums of Porto da Pedra, poses as a tigress - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

One of the highlights on the ground of samba school Porto da Pedra - photo: Nacho Doce / Reuters

Parade of samba school Porto da Pedra in the Avenue - photo: Vanderlei Almeida / AFP

Ellen Roche, Queen of the drums, with her drummers in the parade of Porto da Pedra - photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

Allegoric float of Porto da Pedra - photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

 6th – Beija-Flor de Nilópolis
Full of legends, beliefs and mysticism, samba school Beija-Flor de Nilópolis, of Rio de Janeiro, attempted to achieve the 13th title of the carnival with the theme “São Luís, o poema encantado do Maranhão” (São Luís, the enchanted poem of Maranhão). To tell the story of the capital of Maranhão, the actual champion of Rio spared no efforts and brought to the Avenue about five tons of shells. Linking one section to the other, Beija-Flor de Nilópolis took the public on a tour through the culture of Maranhão.

Front detail of a float with the sombre theme of Beija-Flor - photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

African culture was much present in this parade. To develop the plot, the carnival committee of the samba school went to São Luís do Maranhão. It was during one of these visits, that the committee realized the strong influence of African Negros in the city. Therefore, not only the culture but also the religion and folklore as “bumba meu boi” was visualised in the parade.

Selminha Sorriso and Claudinho form the first couple of master of ceremonies and standard-bearer of Beija-Flor - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

The blue and white intended to terminate its show with a moving tribute to carnivalesque Joãosinho Trinta, who died on December 17 last year. About the fantasies of the first couple of master of ceremonies and standard-bearer Selmynha Sorriso and Claudinho, and the Queen of the drums Raíssa Oliveira, the photos speak for themselves. With the voice of Neguinho of Beija-Flor and the drums tuned under the command of Masters Pliny and Rodney, Beija-Flor was the sixth school that went through the Avenue.

Raíssa Oliveira, queen of Beija-Flor de Nilópolis - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

The Queen of Beija-Flor de Nilópolis, Raissa Oliveira - photo: G1

The Beija-Flor group 'Angústia dos grilhões' (Anguish of the chains) visualised the suffering of the slaves who worked in the construction of São Luís - photo: Victor R. Caivano / AP

Beija-Flor brought the storyline about São Luís do Maranhão and honoured Joãosinho Trinta, ex-president of the samba school - photo: Alexandre Durão/ G1

The float 'O inverossímil imaginário ludovicense' (The unbelievable imagination ludovicense) represents the legends of the island - photo: Alexandre Durão/ G1

Dancers of Beija-Flor sing the samba-enredo - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

One of the highlights in the parade of Beija-Flor - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Members of Beija-Flor dressed as 'sinhazinha do boi' (missy Ox), the farmer's daughter of the Festa do Boi (Feast of the Ox), which represents the European culture - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Dancers of the group 'Bumba-meu-boi me faz dançar' (Bumba-meu-boi makes me dance) during the parade of Beija-Flor - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

The parade of Beija-Flor represented the popular festivals in São Luís - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Allegoric float of Beija-Flor in the Carnival in 2012 parade visualised Bumba Meu Boi, a festival typical of São Luís - photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

Women dance on top of a float of the Beija-Flor titled 'Lamentos de dor no balanço do mar' (Lament of pain on the waves of the sea) - photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

Detail of the head of the giant snake that composes the front-committee of Beija-Flor. Full of legends, beliefs and mysticism, the samba school Beija-Flor de Nilópolis sought the 13th title of Carnival with the theme 'São Luís, o poema encantado do Maranhão' (São Luís, the enchanted poem of Maranhão) - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Muse of Beija-Flor invited the public to join in singing the samba-enredo of the school - photo: Christophe Simon / AFP

7th – Unidos de Vila Isabel
Unidos de Vila Isabel showed the cultural links between Brazil and the African country Angola, with the theme “Você Semba Lá… Que Eu Sambo Cá. O Canto Livre de Angola!” (You Semba there … What I Sambo Here. The Free Song of Angola). The musical rhythm came with Angolan slaves: about 4 million Negros were brought from the region. Vila Isabel also brought to the Avenue a wide variety of African prints, which perceived in the fantasies of the 4,000 dancers, and even in decoration of the seven floats.

Muse of Vila Isabel dancing in front of a float - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Angolan sacred symbol, the baobab, a tree which reaches heights of 5 to 25 meters, came in the form of allegory. It is forbidden to cut this tree, it is very venerable, because it has a lot of utilities, it serves to eat its fruit and leaf, used to store water like a cistern, and when it was war, the tree also served as a refuge.

Member of Vila Isabel represented the fauna of Africa - photo:  Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

Member of Vila Isabel visualises the fauna of Africa - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

The colours, incidentally, were one of the strengths of the parade of the blue and white. The parade ended with a tribute to Martinho da Vila, a musician who maintains strong musical links with the country. The photos tell all about the costumes of the queen of the drums Sabrina Sato and the first couple of master of ceremonies and standard-bearer Julinho and Ruth.

Quitéria Chagas, one of the highlights of samba school Vila Isabel - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Muse of Vila Isabel - photo: Rodrigo Gorosito/G1

After parading with X-9 Paulistana in São Paulo, Luize Altenhofen was also the muse of Vila Isabel - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

One of the highlights during the Vila Isabel parade in Rio - photo: Victor R. Caivano / AP

Muse Sabrina Sato danced the samba alongside the percussionists of Vila Isabel - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Sabrina Sato, Queen of the drums of samba school Vila Isabel - photo: Alexandre Durão/G1

Vila Isabel was the last samba school to join the parade on the first day of the Special Group - photo: Ricardo Moraes / Reuters

Muse of Vila Isabel - photo: Christophe Simon / AFP

Members of samba school Vila Isabel during the parade - photo: Christophe Simon / AFP

One of the highlights of samba school Vila Isabel - photo: Antonio Scorza / AFP

The day was dawning when Vila Isabel closed its parade - photo: Felipe Dana / AP

 That was the first day. Next article the first three of a total of seven samba schools of the second carnival’s day in Rio de Janeiro.